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As you may know, our existing public key methods are at great risk with the advent of quantum computers. So, when the NSA says something about technology, you sit up and listen, as whatever it picks is likely to see heavy investment, and whatever it drops, might drop like a stone. And so, the other day they published their viewpoint on quantum key distribution (QKD) and quantum cryptography [here]:

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And it’s not good news for those involved in QKD research:

QKD is a method for using the physics of quantum mechanics to create a shared secret between two parties. While it has great theoretical interest and has been the subject of many widely publicized demonstrations, it suffers from limitations and implementation challenges that make it impractical for use in NSS operational…


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We have had three highly successful Cybersecurity spin-out companies, and now setting up our fourth with MemCrypt. In each of these, we have made sure that we protect our core IP, as this is so important in making sure you can protect yourself from large companies who will aim to dominate in their field. A core part of creating a spin-out company is defining what it is you have that is special — the magic widget. And the patent gives you the opportunity to write it down in a formal way.

It would be amazing to have a global blockchain infrastructure for inventions, and where you could log your IP and timestamp it, but it will take a major shift in the patent infrastructure to move towards this. For just now, it’s a matter of writing the patent out, sending it off, defending it, and that long timeline of getting a patented accepted. …


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Photo by Chris Montgomery on Unsplash

With conference keying, we have t participants, and each of these generates a secret value (r_i), and then transmit a public value generated from this (Z_i). Each of the participants then uses these values, and their secret value, and will generate the same secret key (K_i). In the following, we will use the Burmester-Desmedt method [1], and have five participants, and with varying sizes of a shared prime number (p), and for a common generator (g):

In the Burmester-Desmedt conference keying method, we have t users and then need to generate a common key (K):

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First, everyone agrees on a prime number (p) and a generator (g). Next, for each participant i, each user generates a random number (r_i), and then compute a public…

About

Prof Bill Buchanan OBE

Professor of Cryptography. Serial innovator. Believer in fairness, justice & freedom. EU Citizen. Auld Reekie native. Old World Breaker. New World Creator.

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